API In the News

In The News

26
Dec
Chief Executive magazine logo - plane advantageWhat does the looming pilot shortage means for private aviation? Dale Buss from Chief Executive talks with bizav CEOs about pilot problems. Business aviation is playing a game of musical chairs these days, as an unprecedented shortage of pilots raises the specter of a CEO showing up on a tarmac somewhere only to find an empty cockpit in the company plane. “We haven’t gotten to the point that an aircraft is just sitting somewhere—yet,” says David Lamb, COO of Clay Lacy Aviation, an aircraft-management company. “But it’s getting tough.”
Meanwhile, 42 percent of all active airline pilots, or approximately 22,000, will retire over the next decade, one industry survey says, with a new mandatory retirement age of 65, imposed by the federal government several years ago, looming as a main culprit. But growth in aviation will require 20,000 extra pilots a year for the next decade, Boeing estimates. So airlines are getting more aggressive about recruiting, which puts a particular squeeze on business aviation. “It’s hard for pilots to justify not going for more time off, a schedule and more money, with an airline, and it’s a hard thing for a corporate operator to compete with,” says Sheryl Barden, CEO of Aviation Personnel International. To make sure they and their clients aren’t losers in this game of high-flying musical chairs, business-aviation players are fighting back in these ways:

Pilot Problems

Increasing compensation is a huge part of that. Pilot salaries in corporate aviation have increased by 20 percent to more than 100 percent, Barden says. Charter company Clay Lacy, for example, just launched a three-pronged program that includes higher salaries, an explicit career ladder and enhanced benefits that include what Lamb calls “zero-deductible, almost no-cost medical” insurance, and likely will add a deferred-compensation option as a sort of retirement benefit.
View the original "Pilot Problems" article in Chief Executive.
18
Dec
flying magazine logo - talent shortage     Sheryl Barden, an NBAA Advisory Board member and president and CEO of API, a business aviation recruiter, says solutions to the problem are only just beginning to emerge, yet she’s concerned. “I’m worried that we’re going to miss an entire generation of pilots because it’s very hard for someone in their 30s to turn down a lucrative airline contract. [They’re thinking], If I join the airline, I’m furlough-proof,” Barden says. “We need to bring pilots into these [Part 91] organizations earlier and partner up to create a career path similar to what’s in place at the airlines.”   Read the full article here
01
Dec
Aviation International News people in aviation Aviation Personnel International promoted Jennifer Pickerel to director of client and candidate services and Jenny Showalter to client services manager. The firm also named Debbi Laux candidate services manager. Pickerel has provided talent identification and placement services to API’s clients and more recently assumed responsibility and oversight of the company’s Candidate Services division. Showalter is transitioning to client service delivery, where she will assist with project management, including the intake of a new search project, candidate identification and selection, and the offer and placement of a hired candidate within a Part 91 or 135 flight department. Laux joined API in a part-time capacity as a candidate specialist and is expanding her role to full-time. To see the original article listing People in Aviation, visit AINonline.com. To view the original press release, click here.
01
Nov
Business Aviation Insider magazine cover - retention tools article Nov 2019Employers are using benefits and incentives as creative retention tools to hold on to business aviation professionals. As some business aircraft pilots continue to pursue what they believe to be greener pastures with the airlines, business aviation employers are increasingly looking to new incentive programs and implementing other job-related benefits to attract and retain qualified industry professionals. “Companies are getting creative,” said Sheryl Barden, president and CEO of the recruiting firm Aviation Personnel International. “One company recently purchased a small airplane for employees to use on a recreational basis, while others now offer company cars to their pilots. Another is looking at how to help employees pay off their student loans.” Business aircraft operators may also counter perceived airline perks, such as guaranteed days off and fixed schedules, by appealing to those with a sense of entrepreneurialism who appreciate a diverse and ever-changing work environment. This article was originally featured in the Nov/Dec 2019 issue of NBAA’s Business Aviation Insider magazine. Please visit NBAA.org or download a copy here.
24
Oct
NBAA women in aviation share secrets to successFive women industry professionals shared actionable career advice for younger women during a spirited and affirming education session held during NBAA-BACE. Each of the panelists shared pivotal moments from their careers in an effort to illustrate how younger women determined to succeed can move forward. Sheryl Barden, president and CEO of Aviation Personnel International, urged all career-minded professionals to advocate for themselves, but also to find a mentor to help them, suggesting that individuals need to discover ways to grow by identifying possible gaps in their skillsets. “I think the most important thing that anyone needs to do is to allow themselves to become vulnerable,” said Barden. “If we’re going to grow, we have to get a little out of our comfort zone.” To view the full NBAA article, click here.
23
Oct

NBAA women in aviation share secrets to successNew Board Leaders Take Office at NBAA’s Annual Meeting

Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 23, 2019 – The voting members of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) today re-elected two individuals to the association’s Board of Directors during an annual meeting held during NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA-BACE).

Additionally, Elizabeth Dornak, of DuPont Aviation, succeeded Gen. Lloyd “Fig” Newton, of L3 Harris Technologies, Inc., as chair; also, Monte Koch, of Falconshare LLC, will serve as NBAA’s new vice chair/treasurer. Leadership on NBAA’s Advisory Council, formerly known as AMAC, also changed today, with Sheryl Barden, of Aviation Personnel International, replacing Todd Duncan, of Duncan Aviation, as chair, and David Davenport, of FlightSafety International, becoming vice chair. As leaders of the Advisory Council, Barden and Davenport will serve as the Business Member Advisors on the board of directors. Sheryl Barden has spent a lifetime in aviation, having grown up in and around the business aviation recruiting firm Aviation Personnel International, where she now serves as the company’s president and CEO. Barden is a leading authority on hiring and leadership development practices, and is a frequent industry speaker. She is an active member of the Society for Human Resources Management, Flight Safety Foundation, Women in Corporate Aviation and the International Women’s Forum. She earned an MBA from the Masagung School of Business at the University of San Francisco and a bachelor of science degree in management, with an emphasis in personnel management, from Pennsylvania State University. She has been a member of the board since 2017, and her term as Advisory Council chair will conclude in 2021. See full press release  
18
Oct
aviation pilot shortage article -atlanta business chronicle logoFaced with an aviation pilot shortage and reduction in technical professionals in the near future, the aviation industry isn’t sitting on the ground. It’s going wheels-up for the future. A recently published report by the Boeing o. stated that over the next 20 years, “804,000 new civilian aviation pilots, 769,000 new maintenance technicians and 914,000 new cabin crew will be needed to fly and maintain the world fleet… The forecast is inclusive of the commercial aviation, business aviation and civil helicopter industries.” “We call it a ‘talent gap,’” said Sheryl Barden, president and CEO of San Francisco-based Aviation Personnel International, which helps corporations and high-net-worth individuals find permanent professionals to fly, maintain and protect the value of their business aviation assets. “Everyone is competing for a finite amount of talent and trying to hold onto the talent they have,” Barden added. “The problem is, we can’t make aa pilot overnight. We can’t make one that fits the requirements in a year or two.” To retain existing aviation staff, business owners are offering higher compensation and better benefits packages, including increases to 401(k) contributions. Barden estimated that pilot compensation has increased in “double-digit percentages” over the last three years. Some companies are increasing pilot head count, which allows for flex-time and time off for regular staff. By Doug DeLoach,  Contributing Writer, Atlanta Business Chronicle Read the article Download the PDF

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